While expanding your skill repertoire is sure to benefit your place of employment in the long-term, asking your boss to fund your upskilling journey (whether it’s a course, webinar or workshop) can be a tricky conversation to have. When you throw the financial repercussions of a global pandemic into the mix, this may seem even more daunting, but as the saying goes, if you don’t ask, the answer will always be “no.”

 

Before you hit the ground running, it’s important to note that some organisations designate separate funding solely to the education of employees. Chat to your HR department first about whether this applies within your own organisation.

 

But if this resource is a no-go, we’ve compiled a few top tips on how to lay the groundwork and convince your boss to invest in your growth. Have a peek below.

 

 

DO YOUR HOMEWORK

Doing your research is a vital first step to motivating your boss to invest in your education. Decide on a course, and immerse yourself in exactly what it entails, from the duration to the breakdown of you’ll be learning for each phase or module.

 

 

MOTIVATE HOW YOUR GROWTH WILL BENEFIT YOUR COMPANY

You need to be able to clearly make the link between the skills you’ll be learning, and how they’ll benefit your company. Frankly, your boss is very unlikely to fund your education if it won’t positively impact your performance or make a meaningful difference to the company.

 

 

FORMULATE A TIME MANAGEMENT PLAN OF ACTION

Your boss will need to know that your further education won’t impact your current performance. That being said, some employers will designate time within your contractual hours for you to attend to your studies. If they don’t, you need to motivate how you’ll be able to juggle both your job and upskilling in a way that won’t impact your productivity.

 

 

SET IT UP

You’re good to go! Send your boss a meeting request and state your case. There are loads of great email templates online to assist you with laying the context for your meeting beforehand.